THE BALLAD OF JAMIE ALLAN

Drama Credits:
Omar Ebrahim: Jamie Allan
Sarah Jane Morris: Annie
Bill Paterson: Narrator
Simon Clugston and John
Harle: Directors
Micha Bergese: Dance

THE BALLAD OF JAMIE ALLAN
Music by John Harle. Words by Tom Pickard.

The Ballad tells the story of Jamie Allan, an eighteenth century Northumbrian. Allan had a double life. He was a magical musician and Piper to the Duke of Northumberland, but also a wanted criminal - a horse thief and army deserter. He died in Durham Jail, aged 75, having been pardoned from a death sentence by the king.
The music was composed by John Harle and the libretto was written by Tom Pickard. Jamie Allan was commissioned by The Sage, Gateshead for their opening season in 2005.
Produced by The Sage Gateshead and The Bauhaus Production Company

Music Credits:
Kathryn Tickell: Piper
The Northern Sinfonia
(Leader: Bradley Creswick)
John Harle: Conductor
Neil MacColl: Guitar
Steve Lodder: Keyboards

VIDEO - THE BALLAD OF JAMIE ALLAN (LIVE PERFORMANCE)

THE BALLAD OF JAMIE ALLAN
Video by Tom Pickard and Chris Sutciffe

VIDEO NAVIGATION
1. The Gypsy Piper 00.00
2. Durham Gaol 03.17
3. Jamie’s Lament 04.45
4. Hey Up and Away 08.27
5. Cumcleugh Gyll 11.57
6. The Sound of Deep Waters 14.22
7. The Gypsy Piper (2) 18.01
8. The Sound of Deep Waters (2) 21.52
9. The Black Act 28.02
10. Away Boys Away 32.46
11. Ralph Saulsby Esq.38.43
12 Join the Army 41.04
13. Fetch the Man Away 44.58
14. Walter Scott/A Low Sky 46.00
15. The River is Dark 47.57
16. The Hawthorn 52.50
17. The Ballad of Jamie Allan 01.00.50

JAMIE ALLAN - Master Musician and Maverick
by John Harle

The musician as ‘outsider’ is nothing new. In a time when music wasn’t piped directly into our heads by omni-present, massproduced recordings in supermarkets or on iPhones, music was a scarce commodity. Travelling musicians were magicians - visiting alchemists to Saturday night parties and social gatherings where, for a brief time, the heartbeat of rhythm and harmony connected people to themselves and to others.

The power of music to remind us of a common humanity that transcends social barriers is a tolerable concept in a ‘liberal democracy’, but in the higher echelons of the feudal Northumberland of the Eighteenth Century, such notions, although undoubtedly huge fun, would have been taken in small doses.

So Jamie Allan’s world was one of brutal contrasts. A plaything of the aristocracy, a master musician, and yet a gypsy living outside convention, suffering the harshness of laws designed to reinforce the social hierarchy his own music eclipsed.

Like Prospero, his music sent him into exile - but Jamie felt no need to apologise.His was an authentic magic. He died at the hands of those he entertained so royally - but still with the sound of the pipes ringing in his ears.